Friday, October 20, 2017

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Day 54 (10/19): Songs of American Romanticism



Warm Up:
Take a few moments to sit quietly.  Consider the silence.  Now consider the sounds that are not there. Consider the sounds that fill your daily experience.

Finally, take a few minutes to write down the sounds that define your existence. Don't be picky, but try to dig deep enough to discover some sounds that might set your existence apart from other people in the world.

Standards:
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
ELAGSE11-12RL9 Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early twentieth-century foundational works (of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, or Multicultural Literature), including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
ELAGSE11-12SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups,and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Essential Questions:
  1. How did the Romantics help create an American mythology?
  2. What role does sound play in our experience of the world?
Agenda:
  • "Atlanta Sounds" is a feature on 90.1 WABE that attempts to capture the texture of the city through the sounds that permeate it.  As we listen to these sounds, consider the way that each sound adds richness to your understanding of the city.  Also, consider what argument about the city the producers are trying to shape in their choices of what sounds to mention.
  • Read/Discuss "I Hear America Singing"
  • "I Hear Carrollton Singing" Collaborative Poetry Project.
  • "I Hear Carrollton Singing" MP3 performance piece.
Homework:


Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Day 53 (10/18): A Walk in the Woods


Today, we will go outside.
  • First we will Read "Thanatopsis" & Discuss
  • Then you will have time to "Go Forth and list to Nature's teachings" while you continue work on your Walden Journal Project

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Day 52 (10/17): Finding What's Important



Warm Up:
Sentence Combo, Option C

Standards:
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
ELAGSE11-12RL9 Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early twentieth-century foundational works (of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, or Multicultural Literature), including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Essential Questions:
  1. What does Thoreau suggest about our priorities?
  2. How are Romantic/Transcendental themes represented in "This Is Water"?
Agenda:
Homework:

  • Read Gatsby - Book Test 10/30
  • Continue Walden Journal - Due 10/26
  • Bring a Jacket - We'll go outside tomorrow

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Day 51 (10/12): Walden


Warm Up:
Combining Sentences: Option B


Standards:
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
ELAGSE11-12RL9 Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early twentieth-century foundational works (of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, or Multicultural Literature), including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
ELAGSE11-12W4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Essential Questions:
  1. What are the qualities of Transcendentalist writing?
  2. What relationships can I see between Thoreau's time and my own?
Agenda:
  • Watch videos and make notes.


Homework:

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Day 49 (10/10): Romantic Poetry



Warm Up:
If you have not already, Please log in right now and participate in the Gatsby Motif poll.

Standards:
ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Essential Questions:
  1. What are the themes of the Romantic Era?
  2. What can Romantic poets teach us about how to live?
Agenda:
Homework:
  1. Continue reading The Great Gatsby.
  2. Write good constructed responses to the questions for each of today's poems.
  3. By Wednesday